Updates social media top six

A few years ago-three to be exact- the top four social media tools for business were

  1. Forums
  2. YouTube
  3. Blogs
  4. Facebook

Today that has changed according to many social media studies.

  1. Facebook
  2. Twitter
  3. LinkedIN
  4. Blogs
  5. YouTube

The purposes for social media often are to increase awareness and exposure of the company and generate those leads. Social Media Examiner provides excellent up-to-date research and tips on improving content, traffic and more.

A thinking proposition

Can you think simply, learn quickly?
1. How do you put a giraffe into a refrigerator?
Stop and think about it and decide on your answer before you scroll down.

The correct answer is: Open the refrigerator, put in the giraffe, and close the door. This question tests whether you tend to do simple things in an overly complicated way.

2 How do you put an elephant into a refrigerator?
Did you say, Open the refrigerator, put in the elephant, and close the refrigerator?
Wrong Answer..
Correct Answer: Open the refrigerator, take out the giraffe, put in the elephant and close the door. This tests your ability to think through the repercussions of your previous actions..

3. The Lion King is hosting an animal conference. All the animals attend …… Except one. Which animal does not attend? Correct Answer : The Elephant. The elephant is in the refrigerator. You just put him in there.
This tests your memory.. Okay, even if you did not answer the first three questions correctly, you still have one more chance to show your true abilities.

4. There is a river you must cross but it is used by crocodiles, and You do not have a boat. How do you manage it?

Correct Answer:? You jump into the river and swim across. Have you not been listening? All the crocodiles are attending the Animal Meeting. This tests whether you learn quickly from your mistakes

Observations of Campaign Techniques-It’s Who you Know

A lovely older woman I know asked me to attend an event to see a nationally renowned Congresswoman. She didn’t say why, just asked me to come and who I could bring. I know the ropes, it’s actually a pep rally to get a group of people excited about the upcoming election. But none of that was discussed. Reminded me of an Amway pitch-I once was suckered into doing that for a while too.

I went because I know this woman, because she asked. I also had in the back of my mind that two interns should go for an opportunity to meet this federal representative. So I shared the appointed time and location with students and gave up a Sunday to attend.

Room was filled with 150-200 people. There wasn’t enough coffee. The food didn’t recognize today’s standards to eating issues–most women my age have given up donuts and fattening muffins for breakfast. Did I mention there wasn’t enough coffee?
The location had the worst accoustics. If you want to plan an event for 200 people you certainly need parking and space. But you also need to be able to have sound. Someone set up the microphone in front of the speakers–assuring hideous feedback every time the Congresswoman moved. Had the speakers been placed closer to the audience so she could walk…er…pace…behind them, she could have stuck with the microphone. In the end she abandoned the microphone to bellow. She was able to reach most of the room, but not those of us in the back. It’s okay, it was a pep rally, I know the drill. She wrapped up and people started to head out. The political aids were all poised at the back to capture departing guests to sign up to volunteer.

What they lacked in setting logistics they made up for in understanding their purpose–get the enthused audience to volunteer. It’s the only reason for the event. I’m sure they succeeded in getting several. Except me and my interns. We have our own campaign. But that’s another post.

Public Relations for small business made visual

Public Relations is all about building relationships with the company, whether you’re a sole proprietor or a Fortune 500 corporation. This graphic shows the basics for the small business owner. Public relations practices aren’t limited to these four. Not included are government relations, employee relations, donor/member relations, multicultural relations and any other “public” you can think of. Other work includes crisis communication and planning, speeches, events, etc. All require brand development, strategic planning and message development-no matter the company size.

What every dental (& other customer service) experiences should be

Let’s face it, when it comes to putting these bad boys in our mouth we really want to know who is doing it. My mom recently went to a new dentist. For the last THREE days she’s been talking about her experience and what great customer service they’ve provided.

First she dropped in on them in person. Hey, she’s retired, she’s got time. They indicated they did indeed take new patients and scheduled her for the NEXTday.

The first thing that blew her away was the phone call that evening. Joshua D.M.D himself called and asked if she had any questions about the next day’s appointment. Not a receptionist. Not even a hygienist. Her actual DENTIST called.

They had a tremendous sales package. If she purchased a plan, all her care would be discounted. Her first medical bill for her first exam and cleaning were the equivalent. So she signed up, and started saving.

At her appointment, they offered her a blanket because they know patients can get chilled.

The dentist noted a condition that she’s had for three years that could easily be addressed. She’d be asking her previous dentist, on deaf ears. The new guy discussed the overall health of all her teeth if this was done. She was so pleased she didn’t have to ask him!

At the end of her first visit they offered her a carnation. A free flower. First day.

For three days as some other thoughtful, caring act took place, she shared. What a great job of providing customer service.

When I looked up their website, they are committed to paying it forward.

Loved the customer service, how they took care of my mom and her needs. How does your dentist customer service measure up?

Social Media Five Reporter Tips same as Traditional

The folks over at PR News do a great job of mini Q&A sessions with keynotes as part of their promotion for seminars. It’s a great PR tactic in and of itself. In their latest post Comcast PR Veteran Walter Neary was interviewed. He mentioned how he hopes one day using social media to reach reporters and bloggers stops being “special”. I agree. If you want to reach the news you need to know where the news people are. More and more tweet, blog or host FB posts. Some base their tool on company requirements, some base their tool on personal preference. Either way, no different reaching out to media on their platforms than if you called, emailed, or met them at the grocery story or local event. All that has changed is the channel of communication. What hasn’t changed is some basic elements:

  1. Know the reporter/editor’s beat (topics covered)
  2. Understand their style-each will tell their story their way, not yours
  3. Provide facts and resources to back those facts up
  4. Respect their deadlines–just because social media as well as media is 24/7/365 doesn’t mean there aren’t deadlines
  5. Build a relationship-sending media releases blindly and never communicating not likely to get you covered. Especially in the social media realm.

We cannot afford to keep blinders on about the race to reach media. If you aren’t on social media, you’d better catch up. If you don’t know how to talk to any media, social or otherwise, you’d better catch up. Or you won’t know what hit you when the Google glasses arrive.